Supermoto Gloves

For the lucky blighters who live in warm climates all year round only one type of glove is generally required, however for us UK residents a summer glove and winter glove is essential. Supermoto riders tend to use street sport gloves, these gloves are similar to enduro gloves with their double-layering and abrasion resistant palms but they have more leather incorporated to increase protection for street riding.


Glove Design

After a crash helmet, gloves are the second most important piece of motorcycle gear you will buy. They keep your hands warm, protect them from debris, give you added grip and feel of the bike, they also tend to be the first part of you that hits the road in an accident and with the latter in mind it’s recommended you don’t skimp on cost. Check that the gloves are marked with the European standard EN13594 and this will ensure quality manufacturing.

There really is only one material when it comes to decent quality glove and that’s leather, there’s nothing else that offers the same abrasive resistant protection.

A decent quality glove should have double stitching at the seams and hardened armour that protects the knuckle area. Some gloves also have a scaphoid protector as this is one of the more common injuries to occur if you fall palm down first.

All gloves should have a good quality membrane, Gore-Tex is the preferred choice as it’s designed to be durably waterproof, windproof and breathable. If you have bought gloves before and noticed stained hands after its rained then chances are the gloves were not to ISO 11642 standards, all gloves with this standard ensure non staining if the gloves get wet.

Winter Gloves

Winter gloves are designed to keep you’re hands warm and to be waterproof. All that extra insulation does come at a cost though, not financial but in the riding of the bike, lack of feel from the bike and vague braking can be a problem. I tend to do allot of one finger braking and winter gloves are pretty hopeless for this.

Getting a glove lining that you can take out is a good idea as they can get a tad whiffy over time especially if you do allot of touring.

Summer Gloves

In the summer keeping your hands cool is a must, although you can buy gloves with mesh fitted for ventilation this often compromises the protection of the glove, a far safer option is to buy gloves with perforated leather and knuckle vents. Most good quality summer gloves are made from either cow leather, kangaroo leather or goat skin, a fair few manufacturers now incorporate them all in one glove.

The knuckle protector is normally carbon, Kevlar or PU plastic. Carbon inserts are often added to protect the fingers and some gloves also come with plastic cuff protectors. Latest designs incorporate Kevlar stitching and leather that is doubled up in high impact areas which make for a very strong glove.

Some manufacturers have added a rubber strip on the index finger for clearing water off the visor which is a useful feature but beware if it’s just a suede pad as this will quickly become saturated. Wrist straps are far better than elasticated ones as they are safer, if your gloves can be pulled off easy then just imagine what they will be like in an accident.

 
 

Buying Tips

Always buy gloves that are made from leather.
Buy a Gore-Tex membrane as this is currently the most effective.
Look for double stitching and proper knuckle / finger protection.
Make sure there isn’t any armour rubbing by clenching your fist tight and then opening the hand fully.
Try a few pairs of different sizes before you buy, you want a nice tight fit across the palm but not constricting in the fingers. It's always best to actually grip some handlebars if you have the chance.
Remember new leather will stretch over time and a glove that’s a comfy fit when new could become to big in a few months time.
Look at your jacket cuffs, some are extra wide and may not let a gauntlet style glove fit properly.
Make sure you are happy with the securing method, you don’t want anything that’s to fiddly or it will become annoying. Some triple cuff closures can be a pain.

How to Measure for the ideal fit.

If you cant get to a shop to try any on then you need to measure your hand for a correct fit. Firstly place your hand flat on a table and then wrap a loose tape measure around the widest point which is normally the knuckles, then make a loose fist.

Note down the measurement and round it to the nearest inch. Refer to the table below to find your approximate glove size.

When buying online check to see that the company will exchange the gloves for free if you have ordered the wrong size.

Hand in Inches

7 - 8.5

8 - 9.5

9 - 10.5

10 - 11.5

11 - 12.5

Hand in cm

18 - 21.5

20 - 24

23 - 26.5
25.5 - 29
28 - 31
Glove Size
S
M
L
XL
XXL
Number
9
10
11
12
13

We would greatly appreciate your opinion on what gloves you wear on the Forum, the pros, cons and any suggestions of what gloves you would purchase next.

 
Tips on buying gloves
Alpinestars GP Gloves
Alpinestars S-1 Glove

 

 

 

 

 

 

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